Gertrud Parker, Dress

FALL EXHIBITIONS 2011
Sept 17 – Nov 12, 2011

artists' reception for all shows.
Sept 24, 2-4 pm


MAIN, SOUTH and WEST GALLERIES
Beyond Tradition: Art Legacies at the Richmond Art Center, Part II
In continued celebration of the Richmond Art Center's 75th Anniversary, Beyond Tradition, Part II features the work of recognized artists that have been a part of the center's history from the 1980's until the present. Curated by Emily Anderson and Anthony Pinata.

COMMUNITY GALLERY
The Anxious Landscape - Photographs by Malcolm Lubliner
Featuring photographs from Lubliner's series titled The Anxious Landscape. The work uses two visually related stories — those places where nature and human enterprise merge and where automobiles amplify the story. What interests Lubliner is the "humorous, ironic, sometimes disturbing edge of environmental uncertainty that has become our common province."

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Previous Exhibitions | Current Exhibitions

M.A.I.N,. .S.O.U.T.H  &  W.E.S.T  G.A.L.L.E.R.I.E.S

Beyond Tradition: Art Legacies at the Richmond Art Center, Part II

C.O.M.M.U.N.I.T.Y. .G.A.L.L.E.R.Y

The Anxious Landscape Photographs by
Malcolm Lubliner

Gertrud Parker Dress
52"x24"x32", Steel,gutskin,rayon,raffia,urethane, 2008

Dale Johnson.

Hung Liu Minghun – Ghost Marriage
Oil on canvas, 80" x 80" 2010. Courtesy of Rena Bransten Gallery.

In continued celebration of the Richmond Art Center's 75th Anniversary, Beyond Tradition, Part II features the work of recognized artists that have been a part of the center's history from the 1980's until the present. The artists in this exhibition have had a solo show, taught, curated, or worked at the art center. These artists encompass talents across an array of disciplines including photography, painting, printmaking, ceramics, glass, video, sculpture, and installation. They investigate a range of subjects and represent the diversity of contemporary artists of the Bay Area.

Curated by Emily Anderson and Anthony Pinata.

Artists included: Seyed Alavi, Mari Andrews, Curtis Arima, Ramekon O'Arwisters, Ray Beldner, Garry Knox Bennett, Mark Bulwinkle, Squeak Carnwath, Enrique Chagoya, Alan Chin, Bruce Conner, Edward Corbett, Tony DeLap, Stephen DeStaebler, Caleb Duarte, Ala Ebtekar, Nancy Mizuno Elliott, June Felter, Thekla Hammond, Rae Louise Hayward, Raymond Haywood, Al Honig, Lynn Hershman Leeson, JoeSam., Oliver Jackson, Tim Jag, Kerri Lee Johnson, Karl Kasten, Marianne Kolb, David King, Lawrence LaBianca, Therese Lahaie, Marvin Lipofsky, Hung Liu, JP Long, Jessamyn Lovell, Harry Lum, Matthew Matsuoka, Karl McDade, Melani McKim, Charlie Milgrim, George Miyasaki, Grace Munakata, Tomas Nakada , Emiko Nakano, Gabriel Navar, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Ortbal, Gertrud Parker, Lucy Puls, Sonya Rapoport, Alan Rath, Rik Ritchey, Rigo 23, Jos Sances, Raymond Saunders, Tiffany Schmierer, Jan Hart Schuyers, Nancy Selvin, Richard Shaw, Louise Smith, Livia Stein, Sam Tchakalian, Robert Tomlinson, Andrée Singer Thompson, Carlos Villa, Shalene Valenzuela, Peter Voulkos, Ann Weber, Heather Wilcoxon, Jenifer Wofford, Kurt Wold, Robert Yarber and Wanxin Zhang.

 

Ken Osborne Blossoms adn Thorns

Malcolm Lubliner Keep Right
Korean War Memorial, Fresno, CA 2000

Featuring photographs from Lubliner's series titled The Anxious Landscape. While photographs of American urban culture and its ethos are part of a well-established tradition, what interests Lubliner is the "humorous, ironic, sometimes disturbing edge of environmental uncertainty that has become our common province." The work uses two visually related stories — those places where nature and human enterprise merge and where automobiles amplify the story.

Exerpt from "The Photographs of Malcolm Lubliner" by: Dr. Robert S. Mattison The Marshall R. Metzgar Professor of Art History, Lafayette College.

Two great themes in American art are landscape and social commentary. In 20th century photography, the landscape tradition is represented by the work of such figures as Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock, Harry Callahan, and Edward Weston. Their photographs were a culminating point for the 19th century Hudson River School paintings and westward-movement photographs where imagining an unmarred landscape in all of its grandeur signified America's cultural heritage. Representations of American society are found in the photographs of Margaret Bourke-White, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Lewis Hine, and Dorothea Lang among many others. Their images captured segments of the varied American social experience. In the hands of such photographers, both nature and culture were seen as communal experiences and as a common reserve for our nation. Our more skeptical and self-critical late-modern age has modified these views. Malcolm Lubliner's photography captures a late-modern sensibility. His photographs of suburban landscapes show that humankind everywhere impinges on nature. For Lubliner, the imposition of sign systems and barriers upon the natural world is one of the marks of our age. Yet the humans who made these objects seldom appear, and Lubliner's photographs have no pretense of defining a social system. Lubliner's photographs never treat their subjects with nostalgia but instead employ gentle irony and self-aware skepticism. But Lubliner does not only wryly comment on displacements in the world around us, he finds both lyricism and pathos in the ordinary. His photographs compel us to look again at those everyday corners of the world that had escaped our attention. The photographs urge us toward new visual discoveries in seemingly mundane settings.

Lubliner, who has exhibited his photographs widely in the United States as well as in Berlin and London, has for three decades pursued ideas that may be connected to his recent landscape photographs. During the 1970s his subject was the automobile in an urban setting. He showed cars as alien creatures that never quite seemed to belong in their environments. In Lubliner's words the cars were "mobile street furniture that abruptly and oddly altered the visual comfort of a place, an irritant living just below consciousness…" During the 1980s Lubliner created a series of photographic still life tableaus using objects that traditionally did not appear in still life—broken glass, torn and folded paper, dead fish, toys and light bulbs. On one hand, Lubliner regards these works as a comment on democracy; even the most unlikely and "inappropriate" objects were welcome subjects. On the other hand, the objects appear displaced, an effect that is increased by the fact that these works were printed on frosted acetate with silver emulsion on both sides and backed by chrome Mylar. The effect is to give the works a glowing weightless character. Their almost surrealist aura resembles that of Man Ray's Rayograms of the 1920s. The references to democracy and displacement in these works, as well as their silvery tone, presage Lubliner's urban landscape photographs that were begun in the 1990s.

Early in his career, Lubliner was influenced by the aesthetics and humanity of John Cage and Merce Cunningham. The attention that Cage and Cunningham paid to ordinary sounds and movements parallels the attention paid to despoiled landscapes in Lubliner's photographs. The Buddhist-like fascination Cage and Cunningham held for ordinary events has important implications for Lubliner's work. Lubliner also had an early interest in the art of Jasper Johns whom he met while Johns was at Gemini, GEL print atelier in Los Angeles. (Between 1968 and 1978 at the height of one of the most fertile periods in American art, Lubliner was Gemini's contract photographer and had the opportunity to work with many of the artists who made prints there.) Johns's intense focus on mundane objects highlighted in the artist's words "What is seen but not known." In John's prints, the subtle tonal range that encourages us to make very fine visual distinctions may be found in the extended gray scale of Lubliner's photographs.

For more information about Malcom Lubliner, visit his website at: www.cityvisions.com

 

Malcolm Lubliner Benicia Park, Benicia, CA 2001

Malcolm Lubliner, Keep Right

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